Archive for April, 2012


infidelity


Men are more likely to cheat than women.  But, as women become more financially independent, women are starting to act more like men with respect to infidelity

infidelity


Some cultures have adopted extreme measures to combat infidelity:  female circumcision, allowing only limited contact between the sexes, and death as a punishment

infidelity


Research consistently shows that 2 to 3% of all children are the product of infidelity

infidelity


If you caught your partner cheating on you, would you forgive and give him/her another chance?

Yes
No
Maybe
It depends
Comment

fun fact


Jealousy is such a fundamental, universal emotion because infidelity has been a part of our human nature for a very long time

infidelity


According to evolutionary psychologists men will be more distraught over sexual infidelity whereas women will be more distraught over emotional infidelity. This is because of paternal uncertainty and secure living


College athletics is now a growing portion of athletes turning to psychologists who understand the demands of sports.  In this reading from ESPN the story of a James Madison University outfielder is told as his 2006 season was truly remarkable.  His own reasoning for his success: the University’s sport psychologist.  This case study helps to correct the stigma of athletes being considered “weak” for seeing psychologists.  The changing of attitudes for this type of psychology is leading to more and more success of athletes at any level

 

 

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncaa/news/story?id=2543474


Sports Aptitude, a psychological firm that pertains to mostly professional athletes, is highlighted with their massive data pool of NBA players who are tested on their likeliness to succeed.  Much like the Meyers-Briggs test, the sports aptitude test simply portrays what they are named: how likely players are to succeed.  I find that basing athletic success solely on a test is a little odd, but they are claiming their test is significant.  Many Professional athletes have participated in the test, while most of them also are clients of Sports Aptitudes athletic psychologists.  This firm is truly groundbreaking, basing solely on the athlete.

 

http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/post/_/id/30517/putting-draft-prospects-to-the-psych-test


Well known  Oregon State University psychologist Greg Warburton discusses his personal methods that his student athletes use.  In the 2007 college world series a pitcher used his Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT’s) while on national television and continued on to win the game.  His methods clearly improve the well-being of his athletes

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2wPML-AxSo


‘I’m proof that hope is never lost’

This truely inspirational article in ESPN magazine talks about the world famous career of Texas Ranger outfielder Josh Hamilton.  Josh Hamilton was said to “have it all” before drugs took over his life and forced him out of professional baseball.  ESPN’s magazine covers his miraculous comeback and of his nature to continue living his life clean.  “I live by a simple philosophy: Nobody can insult me as much as I’ve insulted myself. I’ve learned that I have to keep doing the right things and not worry about what people think.” Hamilton’s thoughts and perceptions are shifted because he is a regular visitor with a psychologist.  Although he felt psychologists at psychology clinics were no good, he still see’s his own personal doctor regularly.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2926447

Aggression


Behaviors are learned, and aggression is a learned behavior. When children are young, the foundation is set for the ways they will shape their personality and behaviors. Parents and caregivers who use patient, consistent, firm, and loving guidance can learn to shape a child’s ability to cope with his or her anger and aggression.

 

What do you think about this?  Do you know of any parents whose children are angry and aggressive towards others?  Do you think their parents have a stake in the way they behavior or do you think it’s the environment in which they live?

OCD


I found an OCD screening quiz. If you or anyone you know think you may be suffering from OCD, feel free to take it. The sooner one gets help the better.

Have you been bothered by unpleasant thoughts or images that repeatedly enter your mind, such as…

1. concerns with contamination (dirt, germs, chemicals, radiation) or acquiring a serious illness such as AIDS?
 No  Yes 

2. overconcern with keeping objects (clothing, groceries, tools) in perfect order or arranged exactly?
 No  Yes 

3. images of death or other horrible events?
 No  Yes 

4. personally unacceptable religious or sexual thoughts?
 No  Yes 

Have you worried a lot about terrible things happening, such as…

5. fire, burglary, or flooding the house?
 No  Yes 

6. accidentally hitting a pedestrian with your car or letting it roll down the hill?
 No  Yes 

7. spreading an illness (giving someone AIDS)?
 No  Yes 

8. losing something valuable?
 No  Yes 

9. harm coming to a loved one because you weren’t careful enough?
 No  Yes 

10. Have you worried about acting on an unwanted and senseless urge or impulse, such as physically harming a loved one, pushing a stranger in front of a bus, steering your car into oncoming traffic; inappropriate sexual contact; or poisoning dinner guests?
 No  Yes 

Have you felt driven to perform certain acts over and over again, such as…

11. excessive or ritualized washing, cleaning, or grooming?
 No  Yes 

12. checking light switches, water faucets, the stove, door locks, or emergency brake?
 No  Yes 

13. counting; arranging; evening-up behaviors (making sure socks are at same height)?
 No  Yes 

14. collecting useless objects or inspecting the garbage before it is thrown out?
 No  Yes 

15. repeating routine actions (in/out of chair, going through doorway, re-lighting cigarette) a certain number of times or until it feels just right?
 No  Yes 

16. need to touch objects or people?
 No  Yes 

17. unnecessary re-reading or re-writing; re-opening envelopes before they are mailed?
 No  Yes 

18. examining your body for signs of illness?
 No  Yes 

19. avoiding colors (“red” means blood), numbers (“l 3” is unlucky), or names (those that start with “D” signify death) that are associated with dreaded events or unpleasant thoughts?
 No  Yes 

20. needing to “confess” or repeatedly asking for reassurance that you said or did something correctly?
 No  Yes

OCD


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4sadYeLHKU&feature=related

Here is another video that shows a person who is suffering from OCD. He explains what is is and how hard it is for him to go through it. I also like how he explains ways he dealt with it that were not good for his health such as smoking and drinking. He acknowledges every aspect of his daily rituals.

OCD


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has been proven to be one of the most effective treatment options for OCD. This method teaches people to confront their fears. The more one tries to avoid their obsessions, the more worse they get. It teaches different ways of thinking, behaving and reacting to situations. This  method allows for them to eventually get used their obsessions until they no longer face the anxiety.

I recently read an article in which researchers wanted to test a theory that an internet based OCD can be a cheapter and more effective way to treat OCD. The —article suggested that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is effective but access to CBT therapists are limited. They decided to develop a internet based CBT (IBCT) in which patients could log onto the website and work with written self-help material and homework assignments as a way of self-help. They would still have the ability to work with an online CBT therapist and it would increase a patient’s access to CBT.

—Participants were chosen from physicians and mental health professionals and self-referral. Information was posted on a clinic’s website. In order to be a participant in the experiment, they had to agree to a consent form which stated that they had to agree to undergo psychological treatment and they also had to have no history of CBT treatment for 2 years prior. —23 patients received 15-weeks of the IBCT program that consisted of psycho education, cognitive restructuring and exposure response prevention. The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was used to assess the patients before and after treatment
—They concluded that IBCT reduced OCD symptoms and improved the patient’s general functioning after the 15 week program.
—They believe that IBCT has potential but there has to be more controlled trials in order to validate the method.
—


There are many signs and symptoms of OCD but there are a few common ones:

—Obsessions or compulsions are not due to medical illness or drug use
—
COMMON OBSESSIONS
—Fear of dirt or contamination of germs
—Need for order and exactness
—Causing harm to another
—Making a mistake
—Excessive doubt and need for reassurance
—COMMON COMPULSIONS:
—Constant bathing, showering or washing hands
—Repeating words or phrases
—Constant counting while performing routine tasks
—Repeatedly checking things (locks)
—Touching doorknobs
—Eating food in an order
—Performing tasks a number of times